Tag Archives: Margaret Atwood

2014 Women Challenge self-reminder

Women ChallengeValentina issued the 2014 Women Challenge and I am bumped it up to Wonder Woman this year in planning to read 20 or more titles written by female authors. My count stands at only ten, so I need to put my cape and gold bracelets on and read!  

Titles read so far:

Vampires in the Lemon Grove: Stories by Karen Russell

Black and Blue by Anna Quindlen

MaddAddam (MaddAddam Trilogy #3) by Margaret Atwood

Their Eyes were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Pigs in Heaven (Greer Family #2) by Barbara Kingsolver

Molly by Sandra White

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? And Other Concerns by Mindy Kaling

The Weight of Blood by Laura McHugh (reviewed here)

Fledgling by Octavia E. Butler

Hippie Boy: A Girl’s Story by Ingrid Ricks

And I’m currently reading:

TMI Mom: Oversharing My Life by Heather Davis

The pick for my book club next month is The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty. It sounds a little like chick lit, but I’ve been assured it is much more than that. My “to be read” list also includes a new title being released by Margaret Atwood, Stone Mattress, some Virginia Woolf, and other great female writers, so I’m confident in my ability to meet Valentina’s challenge. I’m not scared!

It’s not too late – you can join, too! Link up and share your titles to support female authors.

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www Wednesday (August 21)

To play along, just answer the following three (3) questions…www_wednesdays

• What are you currently reading?
• What did you recently finish reading?
• What do you think you’ll read next?

Link back to the the original post at Should be Reading.

What are you currently reading?

I haven’t finished this month’s book club choice, although we’ve already discussed it:

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And I just started reading:

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What did you recently finish reading?

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What do you think you’ll read next?

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Next month’s book club pick looks interesting!

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www Wednesday (January 30)

To play along, just answer the following three (3) questions…

• What are you currently reading?
• What did you recently finish reading?
• What do you think you’ll read next?www_wednesdays

Please link your post back to MizB at Should be Reading, who started this great meme!

What are you currently reading?

I’m reading The End of Your Life Book Club by Will Schwalbe was a gift from a book club friend of mine.  The author writes in memory of his late mother whose end of life he shared while discussing books and feelings about life.

What did you recently finish reading?

Why Have Kids?: A New Mom Explores the Truth about Parenting and Happiness by Jessica Valenti is exactly what the title claims it to be.  It’s her research-based, scathing, look at all the gender-based stereotypes about modern motherhood based on outdated expectations.  She uses a lot of information about parents’ and children’s satisfaction levels, as well as statistics about “non-traditional” families in relation to children’s welfare, based on scientific studies.  Keep in mind, it’s not as boring as that description sounds.  I liked it very much.  Granted, Valenti is one of my feminist heroines.

What do you think you’ll read next?

I’m hoping to read Cat’s Eye by Margaret Atwood (I’m a big fan) if I can figure out how to transfer it to my Kindle. It’s supposedly “checked out” to me through the local library system, but I’m having trouble accessing it. (?)

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Good Books Every Woman Should Read

Thanks to Megan at love, literature art & reason for inspiring this post (from the article at Huff Post).  There are so many young women out there who would have no idea what some of these books are about.

1. I totally agree with the nomination for The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood and call it a “cautionary tale.”  My previous review:

Women who believe in the so-called “traditional” roles of females in society need to read this book. Fatalistic, yes, but scary enough to imagine even in modern times. We should appreciate our freedoms in the U.S. It was a very interesting and important read.

2. An outstanding personal story that has stuck with me for years is Warriors Don’t Cry: The Searing Memoir of the Battle to Integrate Little Rock’s Central High by Melba Patillo Beals.  What amazing strength this young woman showed through her involvement in the America’s 1954 school desegregation process.  No matter what age, women young and old can fight for what’s right!

3. If you ever think you are/were downtrodden as an American woman, read Possessing the Secret of Joy by Alice Walker.  If women don’t support each other, who will?

4. Another more modern example of “Geez, I don’t have it so bad” is offered through The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls.  My previous review:

Disturbing but in a watching-a-train-wreck kind of way. You feel for the kids and can’t stand the parents but almost feel like they are loving in a very twisted sort of way. This a very good book, quick and easy to read, although some situations are hard to fathom.  I’m glad it was recommended to me.

5. Another intriguing fictional “what if” scenario is presented through A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini.  True, some women in America are subservient to their husbands and made to cater to their every whim.  Unfortunately, some are beaten into submission.  This story of polygamist torture is so unnerving you feel the pain while reading about it.  We should all experience the vicarious agony these women withstand in order to empathize with them and work for a world in which women are treated fairly as human beings with equal rights.  My previous thoughts:

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Hate to make the comparison, but I liked it even more than The Kite Runner. These characters were drawn so well and are so memorable to me, I rated it as high as my favorite book, To Kill a Mockingbird. The tale of what these two women endured is an incredible statement about the injustice still happening to females in the world today.

I honestly hope young women (and mature ones, too, for that matter) don’t settle for stories of love-struck wonder and fantasy.  Those titles serve their escapist purpose I suppose, but let’s hope they also strive for reaching their intellectual and creative best while nurturing their own self-respect and self-reliance along the way.

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