Tag Archives: Harper Lee

Good Books Every Woman Should Read

Thanks to Megan at love, literature art & reason for inspiring this post (from the article at Huff Post).  There are so many young women out there who would have no idea what some of these books are about.

1. I totally agree with the nomination for The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood and call it a “cautionary tale.”  My previous review:

Women who believe in the so-called “traditional” roles of females in society need to read this book. Fatalistic, yes, but scary enough to imagine even in modern times. We should appreciate our freedoms in the U.S. It was a very interesting and important read.

2. An outstanding personal story that has stuck with me for years is Warriors Don’t Cry: The Searing Memoir of the Battle to Integrate Little Rock’s Central High by Melba Patillo Beals.  What amazing strength this young woman showed through her involvement in the America’s 1954 school desegregation process.  No matter what age, women young and old can fight for what’s right!

3. If you ever think you are/were downtrodden as an American woman, read Possessing the Secret of Joy by Alice Walker.  If women don’t support each other, who will?

4. Another more modern example of “Geez, I don’t have it so bad” is offered through The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls.  My previous review:

Disturbing but in a watching-a-train-wreck kind of way. You feel for the kids and can’t stand the parents but almost feel like they are loving in a very twisted sort of way. This a very good book, quick and easy to read, although some situations are hard to fathom.  I’m glad it was recommended to me.

5. Another intriguing fictional “what if” scenario is presented through A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini.  True, some women in America are subservient to their husbands and made to cater to their every whim.  Unfortunately, some are beaten into submission.  This story of polygamist torture is so unnerving you feel the pain while reading about it.  We should all experience the vicarious agony these women withstand in order to empathize with them and work for a world in which women are treated fairly as human beings with equal rights.  My previous thoughts:

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Hate to make the comparison, but I liked it even more than The Kite Runner. These characters were drawn so well and are so memorable to me, I rated it as high as my favorite book, To Kill a Mockingbird. The tale of what these two women endured is an incredible statement about the injustice still happening to females in the world today.

I honestly hope young women (and mature ones, too, for that matter) don’t settle for stories of love-struck wonder and fantasy.  Those titles serve their escapist purpose I suppose, but let’s hope they also strive for reaching their intellectual and creative best while nurturing their own self-respect and self-reliance along the way.

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