Tag Archives: feminism

The Mission

A large group of people assemble in a meeting hall for a long-overdue gathering. Through forces unknown and inexplicable, I am granted the supernatural power of omniscient feminist influence by which to reach closed-minded naysayers and misogynists throughout the world, win them over with magical eloquence, and change their previously mislead ways of thinking.

(greeting via loudspeaker)

The mentoring program will commence in just a few minutes. Today’s plan of action is to overwhelming implant knowledge and understanding of feminism, heretofore considered by some a “dirty word,” to the doubtful and mainly conservative minority. While we’ll be here for two hours, there is much ground to be covered. All negative stereotypes will be overcome, and an all-encompassing compassion for humanist issues will be accomplished here forward.

Our mission:

We will convince otherwise misguided people of the innate equality of females.

Points of discussion:

1) Feminism is about equality and autonomy. Women should be valued as highly for their efforts and abilities and have ultimate control over their own bodies.

2) Female sexuality is okay, just like it is for males. Humans are sexual beings who deserve pleasure without being slut-shamed.

3) Our bodies all differ, and that doesn’t mean one is any better than another.

4) We are individual people, not simply objects meant for men’s pleasure.

5) Women should support other women. Everyone needs a little help now and then, and who better to give it than other sisters, mothers, friends, and colleagues?

6) Equal pay for equal work. It’s that simple.

7) That is all.

A few special guests in attendance are:

Sophie Hasty, the 13-year old Hasting Middle School activist who rebelled against the Evansville, IL administration’s initiating a dress code against girls wearing leggings, as they felt doing so “distracted the boys.”

Olive Bowers, another 13-year old who challenged a surfer magazine for misrepresentation of females only through bikini shots and no sports coverage.

Andie Fox of blue milk, a smart feminist writer/blogger who approaches parenting, gender equality/stereotypes, pop culture, politics, and many other things about which she is very savvy.

Jessica Valenti, an intelligent feminist author, speaker and columnist for The Guardian US and formerly The Nation, who tackles tough issues like abortion and rape culture. She’s pretty damn funny, to boot.

  valenti tweet.JPG

Zooey Deschanel who, even through her sweetheart persona, is trying harder than most young American actresses to counter the common notions of perfection via her media presence and collaborative Hello Giggles website.

also inspiredbycharm.com

via inspiredbycharm.com

Jennifer Lawrence, another American actress, who is a vocal advocate of positive body image. She is invited because I trust the public image of her being a down-to-earth awesome role model. Simply stated, she must be awesome.

sheknows.com

via sheknows.com

 

And the keynote speaker will be:

The irrepressible bell hooks, feminist scholar and author of Ain’t I A Woman: Black Women and Feminism, Outlaw Culture and Feminism is for Everybody: Passionate Politics, among others, who will further elucidate those who need to know, as well as we who already know, about the “white supremist capitalist patriarchy.”

via goodreads

via goodreads

 

Through my cosmically granted and omniscient feminist influence, everyone reached through my superpower of mental telepathy realizes what feminists have known since the beginning of time – all women and men deserve to be treated equally.


*The above-listed Indie Chick Lit scenario and love Studio 30+ writing prompt both instigated this post.   I’d love to know who you think should be on the invitation list. Please comment!

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Why I blog – “The Addictive Blog” award

Image I think it’s okay to have healthy little addictions, so having someone supposedly addicted to your blog seems pretty healthy to me!  It was great to be nominated for an “Addictive Blog” award by Paula at Paula’s Pontifications.  Her blog is relatively new to me, but I’m glad to have found it.  She is also an indie writer and fellow yoga enthusiast who has some great insight.

Award Rules:

  1. Thank the person awarding you.
  2. Share a little about why you blog and how the journey started.
  3. Paste the blog award on your page.
  4. Nominate 10 other bloggers you feel deserve the award.

Why I Blog:

My first blog entry on Blogger was back in June of last year after a narcissistic co-worker wanted to share her world with everyone. That act spurred me to ask myself in a self-centered inner voice, “Why not?” There were only a few friends who ever read my writing there, specifically the few who encouraged me to pursue it. That blog remains active, but I save it for my more personal rants. I usually comment on absurdities around me such as gender discrimination, especially as represented through various media, and other women’s issues. It is also a place to follow suggestions of the writers at MissRepresentation.com who promote women supporting each other instead of breaking one another down, which helped me create my weekly gratitude meme.

This blog was instigated by the release of my first novella, Contained, last year in my wee attempt at self-promotion. I also wanted a venue through which to talk about reading and writing in general, two of my great passions. While it’s nice to have other people react to my writing, it’s also fun to interact with other avid readers and indie authors who share my challenges and help encourage me to continue writing.

I’m Addicted to these Blogs:

The Solipsistic Me

blue milk

Peggy Isaacs

Melanie Crutchfield

Whimsically Yours

A Day Without Sushi

MasculinityU

Views from the Couch

Left at the Lights

Synthesist Chronicles

(notifications to be sent later)

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Good Books Every Woman Should Read

Thanks to Megan at love, literature art & reason for inspiring this post (from the article at Huff Post).  There are so many young women out there who would have no idea what some of these books are about.

1. I totally agree with the nomination for The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood and call it a “cautionary tale.”  My previous review:

Women who believe in the so-called “traditional” roles of females in society need to read this book. Fatalistic, yes, but scary enough to imagine even in modern times. We should appreciate our freedoms in the U.S. It was a very interesting and important read.

2. An outstanding personal story that has stuck with me for years is Warriors Don’t Cry: The Searing Memoir of the Battle to Integrate Little Rock’s Central High by Melba Patillo Beals.  What amazing strength this young woman showed through her involvement in the America’s 1954 school desegregation process.  No matter what age, women young and old can fight for what’s right!

3. If you ever think you are/were downtrodden as an American woman, read Possessing the Secret of Joy by Alice Walker.  If women don’t support each other, who will?

4. Another more modern example of “Geez, I don’t have it so bad” is offered through The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls.  My previous review:

Disturbing but in a watching-a-train-wreck kind of way. You feel for the kids and can’t stand the parents but almost feel like they are loving in a very twisted sort of way. This a very good book, quick and easy to read, although some situations are hard to fathom.  I’m glad it was recommended to me.

5. Another intriguing fictional “what if” scenario is presented through A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini.  True, some women in America are subservient to their husbands and made to cater to their every whim.  Unfortunately, some are beaten into submission.  This story of polygamist torture is so unnerving you feel the pain while reading about it.  We should all experience the vicarious agony these women withstand in order to empathize with them and work for a world in which women are treated fairly as human beings with equal rights.  My previous thoughts:

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Hate to make the comparison, but I liked it even more than The Kite Runner. These characters were drawn so well and are so memorable to me, I rated it as high as my favorite book, To Kill a Mockingbird. The tale of what these two women endured is an incredible statement about the injustice still happening to females in the world today.

I honestly hope young women (and mature ones, too, for that matter) don’t settle for stories of love-struck wonder and fantasy.  Those titles serve their escapist purpose I suppose, but let’s hope they also strive for reaching their intellectual and creative best while nurturing their own self-respect and self-reliance along the way.

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Recent Obsessions

Recent Obsessions.  (photo – crazywickedworld.blogspot.com)

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